Better Learning For Schools

curtis

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The Better Learning for Schools Podcast blends educational research, resources, and perspectives from around the world with a bit of humor and novelty. A central focus of the show is to aggregate various capacity-building tools and instructional practices employed both in and out of education, and then explore how they could be utilized in the classroom. Whether, we are concerned with student learning, teacher practices, assessment, student engagement, literacy, classroom dynamics or anything else—in a world this big, there are bound to be a few really great ideas out there somewhere. Let’s find them, explore them, and put them to work in our classrooms. Let’s make sure that we all are working towards better learning for schools.

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Writing For The Government (Better Learning For Schools #40)

June 15, 2016

This podcasts explores what it is like to be an educator who writes for the government.  Our guest is Suzy Meyers–a long time teacher who now works and writes for her state’s Department of Education as a literacy and writing consultant. She helps oversee the training of tens of thousands of teachers when it comes to literacy standards and reading and writing instruction and assessment. Suzy shares tips for communicating through writing with clarity. Curtis Chandler can be contacted at: Twitter […]

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Minkel’s Elementary Writing Tips (Better Learning For Schools #39

May 13, 2016

This podcast explores writing in education with our guest–Justin Minkel.  Justin is an elementary school teacher and was recently named the Arkansas Teacher of the Year.  He was also given the Milken Educator award.  He teaches in a high-achieving public elementary school where 97% of the students live in poverty and 85% are English Learners. Minkel previously taught 4th grade in Harlem, New York City.  His writing and commentary have been featured in the Washington Post, Education Week, and a bunch […]

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Making Time to Write (Better Learning For Schools #38)

February 29, 2016

In this podcast, we visit with Glenn Wiebe.  He is an educator, social studies guru, and blogger on the widely popular website History Tech.  Glenn shares his thoughts on the need for teachers to regularly write alongside their students. Curtis Chandler can be contacted at: Twitter @curtischandler6 Blog:  Prescriptions For Education

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Academic Writing Tips From The Doctor (Better Learning For Schools #37)

December 18, 2015

Since writing is an attempt to fix meaning on the page, do you think educators are held to a higher standard when it comes to writing? The best writers can do is to contribute what they know and feel about a topic at a particular point in time. In this podcast Dr. Curtis Chandler visits with Dr. Janet Stramel about writing and how people just need to get started in writing.  Dr. Stramel shared a tip that it is better to […]

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Different Writing Strokes For Different Folks (Better Learning For Schools #37)

November 18, 2015

Did you know there are essentially five different types of writing? The types of writing teachers are engaged in the most depends upon their district, what is required of them and where they are in their career. In this podcast Dr. Chandler visits with Jennifer Gonzolas; author, mother, teacher and coach about how writing is for an audience and each audience is different and what it takes to successfully write to that audience.   Curtis Chandler can be contacted at: Twitter @curtischandler6 Blog:  Better […]

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Critical Thinking and Writing (Better Learning For Schools #36)

November 5, 2015

Conventional wisdom holds that one of the best ways to help student learn to engage in critical thinking is to foster their ability to write. But as teachers, a lack of well-written, poorly-reasoned student papers might lead us to wonder…  Curtis Chandler can be contacted at: Twitter @curtischandler6 Blog:  Better Learning For Schools  

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Getting Teachers to Write (Better) {Better Learning For Schools #35}

September 3, 2015

It is one thing to help teachers to find the time to write.  It is quite another to give them the tools they need to be able to write better.  In this podcast Sarah Brown Wessling–the National Teacher of the year–shares tips for doing both.  Curtis Chandler can be contacted at: Twitter @curtischandler6 Blog:  Better Learning For Schools

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When A Teacher’s Writing Goes Viral (Better Learning For Schools #34)

July 28, 2015

One of the most challenging aspects of being an educator is getting those outside of the profession to take you seriously.  Unless, of course, you are Lori Rice. Not only did her opinion catch the attention of her legislature, it also ended up in the Washington Post. In this podcast, we hear from Lori about her experiences in the media and in the classroom.  Curtis Chandler can be contacted at: Twitter @curtischandler6 Blog:  Better Learning For Schools

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Recalibrating Project-Based Learning (Better Learning For Schools #33)

May 7, 2015

In education, just because everyone claims to be doing something similar doesn’t ensure that they are doing it well…or the even the same.   Project-based learning, or PBL, continues to gain momentum in schools and districts across the country as a means of ameliorating student engagement, retention of content, and students’ attitudes toward learning (Holm, 2011). But as John Mergendoller recently wrote……popularity can bring problems. …If done well, PBL yields great results. But if PBL is not done well, two problems are […]

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Getting Your Feet Wet with Project-based Learning (Better Learning For Schools #32)

April 22, 2015

As human-beings, we tend to learn the most when we are given something to do and a problem to solve. For example, when I visit with schools, I often challenge teachers to search their own memories of being a student and identify 2 or 3 learning experiences that they considered to be the most meaningful. It comes as no surprise that no one identifies a particular piece of content or an assessment. What they do seem to recall is being […]

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