Problem Based Learning

Erie High School PLP: The Evolution of a PBL Program (Practicing PBL #25)

July 1, 2016

USD 101 in southeast Kansas has had a PBL program since fall of 2007 and has been able to establish and grow a strong program. Kellie Woolf, the Coordinator of the Personalized Learning Program and Steve Woolf, the Superintendent of Erie-Galesburg school district share some of the history of the school program, how it works, and some of the projects their students are doing this year. aquaponics hydroponics/seed center trees maker station NASA contest — 4 girls designed a device to […]

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Quick Question with Steve Woolf: Getting Practical About Building Relationships (PracticingPBL #24)

June 13, 2016

Ginger asks Steve Woolf, USD 101 Superintendent of schools at Erie-Galesburg Kansas about some practical advice for school leaders who want to help their teachers develop stronger relationships with students. As usual, Steve shares an inspirational story, while still delivering strong practical advice of what we can do. “It’s hard to have quality time unless you have quantity time!” Get your copy of Heart2Heart Teaching here: https://shop.essdack.org/prod ucts/all/Steve%20Woolf Steve is a passionate school leader and powerful Best-Keynote speaker. You can […]

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Math Workstations: a bridge from traditional math to PBL (PracticingPBL #21)

March 21, 2016

about Renee Smith: Renee began teaching math in, of all places, a maximum security prison. “I was 21 years old and 99 lbs. soaking wet.”  Some of her students were convicted murderers and as scary as it sounds, it was incredibly sad. Many of those men had failed in the school system and then turned to crime. That early experience with public school dropouts cemented her resolve to help future students understand and succeed in the area of mathematics. To […]

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PBL Meets Math through Cognitively Guided Instruction

February 26, 2016

Renee Smith, Math Consultant and professional learning guru, is in the studio for this week’s episode of Practicing PBL. Renee shares her thoughts about how to shift the traditional approach to teaching math (“I do, we do, you do”) to a more inquiry, problem-solving approach, using the Cognitively Guided Instruction approach.   about Renee Smith: Renee began teaching math in, of all places, a maximum security prison. “I was 21 years old and 99 lbs. soaking wet.”  Some of her […]

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Quick Question: The Impact of Extreme Thinking Upon Self-Regulation (Practicing PBL #19)

February 9, 2016

Extreme Thinking gets a shoutout from Brad as one of the components of the cognitive skill sets. The idea of extreme thinking — “I’m useless, dumb, no good, etc” is a large hurdle that we can help students navigate, if only we would recognize it and then have the tools at our fingertips to help. Just saying, “It’ll get better” doesn’t exactly help. Brad Chapin Blog: http://psychchallenge.blogspot.com/ Website: www.selfregulationstation.com Facebook: Challenge Software & Self-regulation Training The Challenge Software Program at www.cpschallenge.com Want more PBL […]

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Quick Question with Eric Nentrup (PracticingPBL #11)

August 14, 2015

How do we redirect teachers and/or students when they have the temptation to fall away from the rigors and tasty challenges of PBL back into “playing school.”  Eric takes us on a journey of both teachers and students and why they might find themselves stepping back from PBL and moving back into a more familiar way of doing school. He highlights balancing innovation and the realities of daily life, both for himself as a coach and teacher, and for students. […]

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A Friendly Wrestling Match (Practicing PBL #8)

June 26, 2015

Join Ginger and Aaron as they wrestle with the question, “Is PBL something new?” Or is it just a small adjustment from what we’ve always considered good teaching? The discussion then leads into whether it’s a waste of teachers’ time to decide if what they’re doing is actually PBL or “just a project.” Spoiler alert: they decide that ultimately, it’s a waste of time. This is a fun episode for both newbie and veteran PBL teachers to listen to as […]

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The Role Of The Tech Director Supporting A PBL Environment (PracticingPBL #7 Quick Question)

June 18, 2015

John Martin joins us again for a quick question: What is the role of the Technology Director for a Project/Problem-Based Learning environment in terms of access to tools and networks?  John’s quick answer: The tech director’s role is to help teachers do their jobs with their learners. He also talks about shifting from an “Acceptable Use Policy” to a “Responsible Use Policy” and the limits of what’s possible. John Martin @edventures http://jemartin.com/ Father, husband, educator, technology director, school board member and community volunteer. John […]

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Ben Rimes: Moving From Teacher-Driven Instruction To A Student-Centered Classroom (PracticingPBL #5)

April 28, 2015

Join Ginger and her guest, Ben Rimes.  Today they share ideas about helping teachers figure out how to start small when moving from primarily teacher-driven instruction to a more student-centered classroom. Ben highlights the concept of using teachers’ strengths first, instead of jumping right into something the teacher thinks she needs help improving. He also highlights how to begin providing a smorgasbord of choices for students so neither the students nor the teacher become overwhelmed in the process. Whenever or however we […]

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Getting Your Feet Wet with Project-based Learning (Better Learning For Schools #32)

April 22, 2015

As human-beings, we tend to learn the most when we are given something to do and a problem to solve. For example, when I visit with schools, I often challenge teachers to search their own memories of being a student and identify 2 or 3 learning experiences that they considered to be the most meaningful. It comes as no surprise that no one identifies a particular piece of content or an assessment. What they do seem to recall is being […]

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